Easy Japanese Rice Balls: Onigiri

Recipe byPetite Gourmets
October 20, 2021

One of the most popular snacks of Japanese cuisine: Onigiri. Rice balls filled with meat or vegetables are ideal for a practical and delicious meal!

Japanese rice balls, also known as onigiri or omusubi, are a hearty and easy snack. It is a good alternative to sandwiches for lunch. It is prepared with rice, which is one of the most used ingredients in Asian cuisine. They are rice balls with a seafood or vegetable filling. It is usually made by hand in a round or triangular shape.

This quick and delicious snack that can be eaten cold is ideal for your lunch. Try this recipe, which is both fun to make and easy to eat. Bon Appetit.

Onigiri Rice BallsPhoto By Canva
Taste Score: %80
Difficulty Medium
Servings 4 people
Preparation 20 mins
Cooking 50 mins
Total 70 mins

Tips

  • Whether you are unsure about creating Onigiri using your hands or managing hot rice, then you may shape the rice using a piece of plastic wrap. Instead, check out an extensive range of simple rice ball molds.
  • The materials are sufficient to create one Onigiri. Divide the component quantities even by the number of Onigiri you want to prepare to make extra.
  • For the most excellent consistency, we suggest koshihikari rice. Prepare it using the soaking technique in a rice cooker, a multi-cooker, or a stove. When preparing homemade Onigiri, always make sure the rice is hot. It will assist the rice in holding together and allowing you to assemble the typical triangular easily.
  • When keeping Onigiri in the refrigerator to store, cover them in saran wrap or plastic wrap, placing them in a small sealed container. This one will help with hydration retention in the rice and prevent the top surface from hardening out. To prevent the rice from being too cold and hard, one may also cover them inside an additional layer (including a damp cloth or a cotton towel). Keep the nori apart from the rice before ready to eat, or it will get sticky and soggy.

Ingredients

Directions

  1. In a fine-mesh sieve, rinse the rice till the water flows clean. In a skillet, add cleaned rice and six cups of water. Bring to the boil while swirling periodically, above high temperature. Reduce the heat to low and cover it with a plate.
  2. Cook the rice for a minimum of 20 to 25 minutes in simmering heat or until all of the water has been completely absorbed by the rice. Allow the rice for a 10-minute rest, then allow the rice to continue to boil and become soft. Now set the rice aside to cool down a bit.
  3. In a shallow container, add 1 cup vinegar with one tablespoon of salt. Before preparing the shape of the rice, soak your hands with this combination. Make eight equal pieces of the boiled rice. For each Onigiri, only use a scoop of rice.
  4. One serving of rice should be divided in half. Make a dent in the rice and stuff a generous amount of bonito flakes inside. Wrap it with the leftover rice and then gently press to seal the inside filling within the rice ball. Gently squeeze the rice ball into the shape of a triangle.
  5. Put a strand of nori around the triangular Onigiri. On the top, sprinkle a generous amount of sesame seeds. Make a total of 8 onigiris by repeating the process.
  6. Serve it hot or cold. Bon Appetit.
Nutrition Facts
Serving Size 1 Onigiri Rice Balls
Serves 4
Amount Per Serving
Calories205
% Daily Value*
Cholesterol 0.5 mg0.2%
Sodium 218 mg9.5%
Potassium 320 mg6.8%
Protein 8 g16%
*The % Daily Value (DV) tells you how much a nutrient in a serving of food contributes to a daily diet. 2,000 calories a day is used for general nutrition advice.

What is Onigiri?

Onigiri, commonly called omusubi, nigirizushi, or rice ball. It is a Japanese dish prepared with white rice molded into triangles or cylinder forms and frequently covered in dried seaweed, also known as nori.

Originally, an onigiri is stuffed either pickled ume (umeboshi), salted fish, especially salmon, katsuobushi, miso paste, tarako, kimchi, takana zuke (salted takana), or indeed any salty or sour flavor as a food's natural preservative. Several Japanese grocery shops provide Onigiri with a variety of fillings and tastes. In addition, there are also dedicated stores that exclusively offer Onigiri to go. Because of the prominence of this food in Japan, Onigiri has become a renowned staple in Japanese restaurants across the globe.

Despite what people think, Onigiri is not a kind of sushi and must not be misconstrued with nigiri sushi or just nigiri. Onigiri is prepared from plain rice (occasionally mildly salted), whereas sushi is prepared from rice with white vinegar, caster sugar, and regular salt.

How To Wrap Onigiri?

First, wet your hands with water. Then apply some salt. Put the cooked rice in your hand and form a thick triangle. Press a little towards the middle of the triangle and create a dimple. Then put the stuffing in the middle of the rice and gently push it into the rice. Put the rice on the filling to cover it. Prepare the rice balls by pressing lightly with both palms. Straighten the triangle shape with your hand. Wrap the rice ball with one or two strips of nori or sprinkle some sesame seeds on it.

How to Make Onigiri Rice?

It is suggested to use koshihikari sushi rice, which is thicker and stickier and more likely to retain its form. Onigiri is best made using midrange or small grain rice since the grains hold together easier than long grain rice. Rinse the rice till the water flows clean. In a skillet, add cleaned rice and six cups of water. Bring to the boil while swirling periodically, above high temperature. After that, boil the rice on low heat until soft.

What To Serve With Onigiri?

Many side dishes can be served with Onigiri. Teriyaki tofu is a spicy side dish that goes well with Onigiri. Spanish Ohashi is a perfect blend of all subtle flavors. Ramen Egg is another prevalent side dish with Onigiri.

Here are our delicious recipes that you can serve with Onigiri:

How to Store Onigiri?

When keeping Onigiri in the refrigerator to store, cover them in plastic wrap, placing them in a small sealed container. This one will help with hydration retention in the rice and prevent the top surface from hardening out. To prevent the rice from being too cold and hard, one may also cover them inside an additional layer (including a damp cloth or a cotton towel). Keep the nori apart from the rice before ready to eat, or it will get sticky and soggy.

Recipe Variation

  • Cooked Chicken Onigiri: The process of making Onigiri is the same as illustrated above. Instead of adding bonito flakes inside the rice ball, add boiled chicken with seasonings such as salt paper, chives, soy sauce, and much more. Make a hole inside the rice ball and stuff the chicken generously. Gently squeeze the rice ball to get the desired shape.
  • Tuna Mayo Onigiri: Tuna Mayo onigiri is the best filling of Onigiri. Tune is a kind of fish mixed with some seasoning and creamy mayo. Filled inside the Onigiri and pressed gently for the desired shape.

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